I love a quiz; especially one that’s about design.
 
They’re fun and you always wonder if you’ll discover something new about yourself.
 
The results certainly aren’t written in stone and a quiz alone is not going to make your decisions for you. However, they can give you a sense of your design style. You may discover aspects of design you hadn’t thought of before or confirm that the design style you’ve chosen fits you to a T.
 
So whether your style is neutral, traditional, contemporary, or eclectic, grab a cup of coffee or tea, take a short break and discover the design style that perfectly fits you. Chances are your style will carry over to your other spaces as well. This quiz involves your bathroom.
 
FYI: My personal design style is neutral which is spot-on. What is yours? I’d love to hear in the comments.
 

TAKE THE QUIZ HERE

 
Until next time…
 
Blessings from my home to yours,
 
Nancy
Dedicated to helping you create spaces that foster happiness and well-being
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Of all the most desired items requested in kitchen design, a kitchen island ranks among the top.

However, it can be challenging to fit an island into a small kitchen. Rule of thumb is 42 inches of width is needed for a single cook’s work isle and 48 inches for more than one cook. You also need at least 3 feet for a walkway. With an average island measuring 25 to 40 inches deep, you can easily see the problem.

However, all is not lost and you can have an island that accommodates a smaller kitchen. Take a look at these photos:

 

This home owner wanted an eat-in kitchen table with chairs which narrowed the width of the kitchen. However, there was still space for a narrow kitchen island giving more work space in this kitchen which it needed.

In spite of this kitchen’s narrow width, installing a narrow island whose compact work surface makes it useful for performing various tasks.

Consider how you’ll be using your narrow kitchen island. In this photo, work space is on top with open storage provided on the bottom shelf. You may decide to have closed storage. Either way, it’s what works best for you and your needs.

This kitchen island was designed to provide the owner a place to sit and enjoy a beverage, plan the day, or give a place for a friend to sit and visit. Make sure if you want this kind of configuration, that the person seated doesn’t get in the way of the cook.

A narrow island will not allow enough space for a sink or cooktop, but it still allows surface area for food prep and an easy place to set hot dishes when removing them from the oven.

A narrow kitchen island on wheels could be the perfect solution if you’d like moving it as needed. Just make sure the wheels can lock.

You want your kitchen island to fit the shape of the kitchen itself. If it’s long and narrow, the island should configure to that shape. The same applies if the geometry is square-shaped as in this photo. Your entire kitchen will function much more effectively.

I hope this article gives you ideas you could implement if you’d like to have a kitchen island in your smaller kitchen and maybe thought you couldn’t. As always, the best design is Mindful Interior Design to allow your home to work for you in every way.

Until next time…

Blessings from my home to yours,

Nancy
Dedicated to helping you create spaces that foster happiness and well-being

 

Photos via HOUZZ

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It may not be something you usually think about, but maintaining the correct amount of humidity in your home can affect all who live there—particularly sensitive individuals who suffer from allergies and asthma.

Both too much or too little humidity can lead to unhealthy airborn particulates.

The EPA recommends keeping healthy humidity inside your home between 30% and 50%. You can easily check the levels with a digital humidity meter, or hygrometer found at any hardware or big box store.

This week’s article from Freshhome explains how too much humidity can affect your health and the condition of your home. And just as important, how to take care of the problem.

Maintaining good air quality in your home is important for the health of your entire family. Either too much or too little humidity can lead to the rise of unhealthy airborne particulates. The EPA recommends keeping relative humidity inside between 30% and 50%. You can check the levels in your home with a digital humidity meter, or hygrometer, which you can find at most hardware stores.

Use exhaust fans in the kitchen when cooking. Image: Decozilla

What happens if you have too much indoor humidity?

You can tell if your indoor air is too humid if you notice:

  • Condensation on windows
  • Water stains on your fabrics or hardwood floors
  • Stale or musty smells in the furniture or carpet
  • Mold in the bathrooms, basement or under the sink

Molds produce allergens, irritants and sometimes potentially toxic substances. Mildew and dust also thrive in humidity.

Open windows whenever you’re cooking or running the dishwasher to alleviate high levels of humidity. Exhaust fans in your kitchen or bathroom can also help. The easiest way to combat high humidity levels is to turn on your central air conditioner. If that’s still not enough, you might need to invest in a dehumidifier to dry the air.

Don’t let your laundry room house extra moisture. Image: DecorPad

Explore the types of dehumidifiers

A dehumidifier’s drying capacity is measured by how many pints of water it can remove from the air within 24 hours. You may only need a small dehumidifier to control the moisture in one room or a small apartment. These are relatively inexpensive.

Most portable, single-room dehumidifiers are self-draining and come with a drain-hose connection. You’ll need to place it in an area where the hose can empty water, such as a laundry room sink. Dehumidifiers with large tubs or drip pans can hold more and will need to be emptied less often. Some dehumidifiers use evaporation technology, so a drain hose isn’t required.

Another option is installing a whole-home dehumidifier. These connect to your existing ductwork and must be professionally installed.

Moisture from the shower can linger in your bathroom. Image: DecorPad

Design tips to reduce humidity in your home

Investing in a dehumidifier is one option, but there are also simple design tricks you can use to help reduce your home’s humidity levels. If you’re in the process of redesigning or redecorating your bathroom, consider using mildew-resistant paint and primer. Even if you only use this paint for the lower parts of the walls, it can cover old mildew stains and prevent new spots from developing. You can also swap bathroom rugs for tile floors to prevent mold and mildew from building up.

Plants help decrease the humidity in the home. Image: Rahult

Add indoor plants to decrease indoor humidity and make your home feel inviting. A peace lily can absorb humidity and toxins through its leaves. Peace lilies only need indirect sunlight to grow, making them ideal house plants. If you’re looking for a plant that can be hung, the English ivy might be the perfect fit. When they’re hung up high, they absorb the humidity rising in the air, and you don’t have to worry about knocking them over.

Keep plants out of reach so they don’t get knocked over by kids or pets. Image: StyleCurator

A few simple updates can make a big difference when it comes to the quality of your indoor air. Which tips will work best in your home?

Until next time…

Blessings from my home to yours,

Nancy
Dedicated to helping you create spaces that foster happiness and well-being

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Sometimes it just is what it is.
 
Your room’s foot print is smaller than you’d like and remodeling the the space isn’t in the cards.
 
Fortunately, there are interior design tricks that can visually allow a space to appear larger than it really is.
 
Here are a few suggestions that will make you feel your small space has never looked bigger.
 
1
The shape of most small rooms is square. Add furniture and rugs that are curvy or irregularly shaped as the area rug in this photo is.
 

2

A light-colored rug will always visually enlarge a space. If the floors are stained dark or even if there’s an existing dark carpet, a bound carpet remnant in a light color will give the feeling of a larger room.
 
3
 
Add curtains. They’re dramatic and give a lush feel. Hang curtains outside of the window frame and even cover bare walls. Hang them from floor to ceiling and make sure you have enough fabric to avoid a skimpy look. Note, too, the large mirrors in this space that can instantly double the visual size of the room.
 

5

No, a large sectional won’t work well in a small space, but consider scale. A tiny little couch will actually close a room in and appear smaller. Look for a moderately sized one.
 
6
Lucite furniture like the desk in this photo seem to disappear and open up a space. It appears to float and that visually creates a feeling of more room.
 

7

The Murphy bed is a tried and true way to have more room. They’ve come a long way in looks and comfort from what they were back in the day.
 
8
Lighting is another way to create a feeling of space. Have many sources of light in a room. There’s also no better way to giving a room a warm and welcoming feel.
 
9
Because space is limited, make sure the room is designed to suit your needs. You may need a desk, for instance, but not a dining table. It’s your home and you get to choose whatever enriches your life more.
 
10
Instead of lots of closed cabinets, floating shelves are another option that will immediately open up your space visually. 
 
These are just a few design ideas that can visually enlarge a small room.
 
If you have a small space challenge and need help, send me an email at Me@nancymeadowsdesigns.com and we can talk about solutions.
 
Until next time…
 
Blessings from my home to yours,
 
Nancy
Dedicated to helping YOU live your rooms—not the other way around
 
Images courtesy welldesigntips
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Hallways are often not given the design attention they deserve.
 
They’re areas that we quickly pass through to get from point A to point B, and yet this space can be a place to stop and take notice.
 
Hallways offer design opportunities using lighting, artwork, sculptural pieces,mirrors, and furniture (when space allows) to reward you with even more pleasure from your home.
 
Decorating a hallway adds life to the space. Along with color and detail you’ll add personality to the area as well; it goes from “nothing” to “something.”
 
HALLWAY TIPS FOR DESIGN SUCCESS:
 
  .  Average hallways using American standards are generally 36 inches wide which is needed for comfort and accessibility.
 
  .  When hanging artwork and photos, place at eye level which is about 62 inched from the floor to the middle of the piece.
 
  .  Ceiling light fixtures should clear 84 inches.
 
  .  Lighting is important in a hallway, lest whatever you are displaying become obscured in shadows.
 
  .  In a narrow hallway, hang smaller pieces as larger ones require more space to fully see and appreciate.
 
  .  Use the the hallway for a pop of color, but because this area connects spaces, there should be a visual tie between the hallway into the connected spaces beyond.  .  
 
  .  Consider the hallway ceiling. Ideas here could be a different paint color, stencils, or wallpaper.
 
  .  If you need or want a furniture piece in a narrow hallway, look for a skinny console table to give you some surface space. Just be sure to have enough space for easy walk-through room. If in doubt, don’t.
 
HALLWAY DESIGN IDEAS:
 
Scandinavian Hall by Dash & Albert Australia
With the light-colored walls, your eye is immediately drawn to the floor runner and the artwork. There’s enough room to add the chair and small table which completes this simple vignette.
 
Transitional Hall by Allison Lind Interiors
Using a black and white wallpaper pattern and same color picture frames, this red chair pops and visually draws you into the space.
 
Eclectic Hall by Morgante Wilson Architects
This is the same concept as photo 2, except a dark paint color is used making the white chair pop. Notice, too, that the adjoining room on the right is using the same darker shade which visually connects the two spaces.
 
Eclectic Hall by Kim Pearson Pty Ltd
In this white space, the stunning architectural archway and the artwork serve as a punctuation point making you want to walk towards the end of this hallway.
 
Transitional Hall by Chipper Hatter Architectural Photographer
A study in Zen, and beautiful in its simplicity. Uses black and white along with small hits of red and green color.
 
Contemporary Hall by Mafi Australia
Again—simple and clean-looking design. The furniture is perfectly scaled to this hallway. The beauty of the archway and quiet artwork effortlessly draw you in.
 
Contemporary Hall by Vivendi - Luxury Home Builders
You immediately learn something about this homeowner through the display of surfboards and the art at the end of the hallway. This area of your home can be a great place to share your interests.
 
Transitional Hall by Bibby + Brady
Black framed photos add interest, but what really moves you down the hallway is the wallpaper and simple furniture leading into the next room.
 
Transitional Entry by Bibby + Brady
There are many points of interest in this hallway, but especially noteworthy are how the pink in the artwork and the flowers connect with the window treatment in the next room. Also notice the unusual light fixture and the choice of ceiling color. So much of good design is in the fine details.
Modern Hall by Accoya Wood
A hallway so rich in architectural detail only needs the simple mirror as the focal point.
 
Until next time…
 
Blessings from my home to yours,
 
Nancy
Dedicated to helping you live your rooms—not the other way around
 
Photos via HOUZZ
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This week’s article is a guest post from Amy Spagnola for Luxe Decor.
It’s all about the entryway. Enjoy!

Nothing sets the tone of the home more than the front entryway. A first greeting to guests, the foyer is an important part of a home’s vitality. A cluttered and confusing entryway represents some type of energetic dysfunction.

If you’re seeking to recharge your home’s vestibule, there are plenty of ideas for increasing peaceful and serene vibes. Here are a few design ideas to give your home’s entryway a touch of tranquility:

entryway-image-1Image Credit: Image Via Popsugar

A symmetrical minded entryway is full of character. Matching lamps, picture frames and tables creates a sense of harmony. Neutral colors and simple gold frames add even more delicate and down-to-earth energy to the front of the home.

entryway-image-2Image Credit: Country Living

A farmhouse-focused entryway is filled with trinkets and treasures. Not distracting or disorganized, this layered entry space is country chic. A little bit of plant life, a few baskets and a bit of artwork signals a home with cozy comforts and traditional style.

entryway-image-3Image Credit: Image Via Paul Davis New York

Light, bright and modern, this sleek entryway is inviting and appealing. A central table with a few books and flowers offers a spot for guests to set valuables or homeowners to place keys and handbags. A large orange corner chair indicates the start of a restful and colorful space.

entryway-image-4Image Credit: Image Via Love Home Design

The mood of this home entryway is relaxed and carefree. Filled with calming neturals, multiple seating stations and a bit of friendly décor, this space is easy and effortless. A vintage bench, high-back chair and a couple candleholders, make this space feel charming without being overpowering.

Guest Post by Amy Spagnola for LuxeDecor

 

Until next time…
Blessings from my home to yours,
Nancy Meadows,
Dedicated to helping you live your rooms—not the other way around
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As an interior designer and lover of all things beautiful, I love re-purposing furniture. It’s not only good for the environment, but it can also be cost-effective, charming, and out-of-the-ordinary.
Here are 13 examples of unconventional bathroom vanities that have stepped out-of-the-box to find  new life in a different way than originally thought of. Take a look.
TIPS:
  • You will likely need a carpenter to re-configure drawers in order to accommodate the sink and plumbing. You also want to maintain as much storage area as possible.
  • If there is not a material like quartz, granite, etc., on the top of the furniture, apply a wood sealer such as used on boats to prevent water damage.
There you have it. Different ideas and different design styles for re-purposing a piece of furniture into a bathroom vanity. You may have an old piece in storage that you could use in this way. If not, and you like the idea, check out Craigslist, antique malls, or yard sales. You may be surprised at what treasures you find.
Until next time…
Blessings from my home to yours,
Nancy
Dedicated to helping you live your rooms—not the other way around
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There are any number of reasons why you may choose to rent rather than purchase a home.
You may be downsizing and simply don’t wish to have the burdens that come with home ownership. When the sink leaks, for instance, you’d rather call the manager or owner and the problem is fixed—no muss, no fuss.
Or, you may be building a home and need a place to live in the meantime.
Or maybe you or your parents are moving into an assisted living complex.
Again, there are many valid reasons why renting an apartment or home is the best option. However, there can be challenges. One of them are restrictions as to what you can do with wall decor.
Your apartment is your home and however long you reside there, you want it to reflect your taste and who you are in the world. You don’t want it to look and feel temporary.
So how do you satisfy your design dreams and also the rental owner’s rules?
Freshome offers 13 ideas that can help you with this design dilemma so everyone wins. Take a look.

Removable wallpaper

When most people think of wallpaper, the first word that may come to mind is “permanence”. Not a great move if you’re renting. Removable wallpaper, however, swoops in to save the day for renters, and maybe homeowners with commitment issues. Gone is the terror of peeling off tiny bits of thin, dried paper. This modern decor tool goes easy-on, easy-off in countless modern prints and patterns. Your landlord will be none the wiser.

tapestry modern wall decorating ideas

Image: Nanette Wong

Hang a tapestry

Tapestries aren’t just for bohemian interiors anymore. While there are plenty to be found with intricate medallion designs, there are also countless choices to fit any decor style. Geometric patterns or abstract prints compliment contemporary style, while printed outdoor images, quotes, and minimalist designs bode well with more modern settings.

wall curtain wall decorating ideas

Image: hooray blog

String a curtain

If a tapestry just doesn’t fit your style, a curtain might do the trick. A simple, solid drapery softens the room without adding too much fuss. The mounts won’t do much damage and, in a pinch, tensions rods would do the trick. We personally love this look behind a bed.

gallery wall decorating ideas

Create a (shelved) gallery wall

Want the trendy gallery wall look, without the mess of drilling a dozen holes in the wall? Consider using floating shelves instead. Sure, you’re still putting a few holes in the wall to install the shelves, but you’re also able to change up your selection at any time without new holes. Look for floating shelves with a small outer lip to stop slippage. Otherwise, use some wall putty to hold the frames in place.

Frame a statement piece

A large piece of art doesn’t have to weigh you, or your walls, down. Hanging a poster or large photo has to do entirely with what it’s framed in. Find a lightweight poster frame, or alternative method — like these wooden bars, which leave the poster intact and give any artwork a clean, crisp look.

big mirror wall decorating ideas

Image: bloglovin’

Add a mirror

You’ll need a mirror anyway, right? Go big with a framed floor mirror, which can be found relatively inexpensively. Not only will it take up a considerable amount of your wall space with zero holes, but it will also help reflect and create light throughout your apartment. Again, wall putty is your friend here.

DIY copper shelves wall decorating ideas

Image: homeedit

Go green

A little green can go a long way. Dress up your walls with some of your favorite houseplants, whether by hanging a pot from a ceiling hook or placing a plant stand in front of your bare walls. The open shelving from your gallery wall also gets a lively upgrade with a plant, as shown above.

Stick on a decal

Wall decal stickers are widely available online and offer something for everyone. Whether it’s adding a shape like stripes, stars or polka dots, channeling nature with trees and leaves, or writing out your favorite quote, there are an endless number of styles and designs. Think about size and placement. Decals come in sticker or wall-cling materials, both which are a breeze to remove when the time comes.

neon sign wall decorating ideas

Image: Z GALLERIE

Flash some Neon

An eye-catching statement piece doesn’t have to be enormous — it just has to be eye-catching. Neon signs are just that. Grab a vintage one of your favorite brand, or find a new one with a fun saying or image that will have everyone talking.

Be crafty with washi

Heard of washi tape yet? It’s the Japanese version of masking tape. Made from rice paper, it doesn’t leave the residue of the stuff we have stateside. Even more appealing, it comes in a massive variety of colors and patterns. Hanging your pictures, prints and other paper goods with a piece of washi tape for an easy gallery wall, or create your own geometric mural with it.

Get organized

Use your spare wall space to get organized. From cork boards to calendars, get your style on while staying on schedule.

 

large wall map wall decorating ideas

Image: Lake Jane

Map it out

Maps aren’t going out of style anytime soon, and we say the bigger the better. A vintage style adds class to your space, while more classic styles can accommodate any decor style. Hang it like you would large art, and you’ll be seeing the world from the comfort of your couch. Bonus points if you flag the places you’ve traveled.

Hang it up

Calling all trendsetters. Displaying your favorite clothing and accessories with this trending wall decor. Hats are big this year (in fashion as well as wall decorating ideas), but sweaters, scarves, even jeans could hand decoratively on small nails for a look that’s ultra-chic.

What are you favorite no-fuss wall decorating ideas? Reach out to us in the comments or on social media — we’d love to hear from you!

Until next time…
Blessings from my home to yours,
Nancy
Dedicated to helping you live your rooms—not the other way around
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Having recently completed one master bathroom remodel and about to start another, I definitely have bathrooms on the brain.
 
One of the biggest challenges is having ample storage space that is functional and esthetically beautiful and visually calming.
 
Here are 10 examples for creating extra space no matter how big or small your bathroom is. Take a look.
 
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Almost all homes being built today or re-modeled, have an open concept design. Simply put, the kitchen, dining, and living areas become one open space.
While still enormously popular, for this week’s post I’m going to play devil’s advocate and say this might not be the best floor plan for everyone. Here’s why:
.  For one thing, open floor plans can be difficult to decorate as it can be a challenge knowing
   how to best delineate the different spaces. Each area has a different function and there’s the
   risk of looking hodge-podge.
.  Secondly, there’s often little wall space for artwork and other decorative items.
.  Lastly, it’s difficult to create cozy, intimate areas.
What if it’s possible to have the best of both worlds? What if you could have separation without closing off? Achieve unity while still keeping definition? Have a slight separation of each area, yet allowing each its own personality and warmth?
It’s certainly possible as the following photos show. Take a look and see what you think.
In this photo, a fireplace wall subtly separates the living area from the kitchen and dining areas. It’s still open, but gives a feeling of privacy and specific use.
An open shelving partial wall allows light to pass through the spaces, while the wide door opening separates the different areas yet still connects them.
The home office is separated by using an internal window wall. Again, it’s still an open space, yet there’s a feeling of privacy while still being a part of the living area.
A wide opening separates the spaces while still being open to the connecting areas.
All of these examples show how different levels and in some cases different ceiling heights can create separate areas, yet still connected. Psychologically, you can feel alone if you wish, yet still a part of the different home activities.
A partial wall makes the function of each space easy to see and use accordingly while still being in an open space.
A half wall separates the living area from the kitchen. You can still be preparing meals while interacting with family and/or guests. Not every cook wants the mess of a kitchen to be shared.
Sliding doors may be the solution when you want or need privacy, yet still have the option to open completely keeping an open space plan.
These are excellent examples of a compromise between a large and completely open space and closed off individual rooms.
If one large open space is just too big and open for you, open yet separated areas could be the perfect solution.
Until next time…
Blessings from my home to yours,
Nancy
Dedicated to helping you live your rooms—not the other way around
Photos via HOUZZ
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