Having a window wall is a definite plus. It lets a lot of natural light into a room and it’s especially terrific if it looks out onto a lovely view.
But it can also be a source of frustration if you’re not sure how to use the space underneath the windows. By not wasting this area, you gain a lot of the room’s functionality. Is there ever too much space? One TIP is if the room receives a lot of sun, consider using solar shades. They can be mounted from the ceiling and will protect not only your eyes, but carpets and furnishings as well.
Take a look at these photos for some good ideas from HOUZZ.
The shelves are perfect for extra storage and also hides the radiator on the far right. while allowing for sufficient air flow. This design is great for a kid’s room.
Perfect space for a desk, particularly in a smaller home where there isn’t room for a designated office.
A large daybed with storage drawers underneath. Wouldn’t you feel like a cat dozing in the sunshine on this bed?
Another daybed that’s narrower than the previous photo and fits perfectly with the frameless window. It takes advantage of extra storage space underneath as well.
A low bookcase fills this space beautifully and it’s as sleek-looking as the home’s architecture.
A built-in dresser which saves space and also deals with a not so attractive radiator.
Until next time…
Blessings from my home to yours,
Nancy
Dedicated to helping YOU live your rooms—not the OTHER way around
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clutterYou’ve packed away the holiday decorations for yet another year. Wrapping paper, rripped boxes, and torn ribbons have made their way to the re-cycle bin. Guests and relatives have returned home and a certain quietude returns.
An emotional let-down can also happen at this time. Your home seems somehow empty without the glitter and lights you so enjoyed over these last weeks. Sort of like blowing out candles; the light is diminished. Maybe this year another focus is called for.
Instead of waiting for Spring cleaning, maybe this is the perfect time to do it. You’ve already started by doing your holiday clean-up.
Following are words from SALLY AUGUSTIN, Ph.D (sallyaugustin@tdesign withscience.com). They’re from an article she wrote for PSYCHOLOGY TODAY. She speaks of clutter in a deeper and different way:
“We continually accumulate stuff. Stuff isn’t trash, it’s torn out magazine articles set aside to read later, gifts that haven’t quite made their way to their final resting place, and cozy nests created to fight off the winter chill—in a word, it’s clutter.
Clutter is mentally exhausting. In our less developed prehistory,, we needed to continually survey our environment to make sure that nothing that found us appetizing was approaching. It’s easier to review a less cluttered environment; danger stands out more clearly. That survey behavior from long ago is probably at least one of the reasons that we prefer less complex wallpaper today. Each time we review a space, our eyes linger on each item there so clutter is also stressful because it takes us longer to complete an “environmental sweep.”
Clutter is undesirable for another major reason. We use the design of spaces we control and the objects we place in those spaces to communicate to ourselves and others who we feel we are—at least on our good days.
We are very good at reading our own environments and those of others—research has shown, for example, that we can pretty accurately assess a person through a quick review of places they control. We can even estimate how well a space could communicate who we are—that’s why we can take a couple of steps into  a perspective home and decide if it’s the space for us.
Excess objects and disorder can cloud the message sent by a space. Not clearly presenting ourselves through a space we control causes stress. Imagine that the spaces we control are topiary plants—they always need to be trimmed so people can determine the story we’re telling.”
So what do you think? Couldn’t this be a great way to start the New Year? You’ll have your Spring cleaning done well ahead of time. Best of all, you’ll feel really good about your home and yourself.
Until next time…
Blessings from my home to yours,
Nancy
Dedicated to helping YOU live your rooms—not the OTHER way around
For Tips on De-cluttering Your Home Room-By-Room, check out these articles:
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Modern design today favors open spaces such as a family room/kitchen/dining area.

But sometimes rooms that are too open can seem, well, too open. They can lack a feeling of intimacy and a certain comforting coziness.

You don’t want floor- to- ceiling walls, but you may want a room that is open but still gives a feeling of defined spaces.

The best way to have the best of both worlds is using room dividers and partitions.

And there are so many ways to design them that fit the architecture and style of your home and the feeling you wish to convey.

Take a look at these examples, some use nature and others incorporate various materials.

Using plants as partitions is a particularly creative and beautiful solution to the room divider issue. These vines climb up ropes to create an indoor jungle that also separates spaces.
This plant divider is a bit more opaque and requires regular trimming (along with water) to keep its sleek shape.

This plant divider is a bit more opaque and requires regular trimming (along with water) to keep its sleek shape.
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An even more vertical solution, this wall with built in planters is part room divider, part garden.

An even more vertical solution, this wall with built in planters is part room divider, part garden.
In this modern office space, both plants and furniture divide the area with tall spiky greenery emerging from the back of a low modern couch.

In this modern office space, both plants and furniture divide the area with tall spiky greenery emerging from the back of a low modern couch.
This curtain of hanging planters rounds out our green room partitions. It would be simple enough to hang this in a sunny space and fill each planter with a different herb, making this option both beautiful and delicious.

This curtain of hanging planters rounds out our green room partitions. It would be simple enough to hang this in a sunny space and fill each planter with a different herb, making this option both beautiful and delicious.
Too many walls and a room can feel small and cramps, but not enough and distractions abound. This half wall with beams and a beaded curtain lets in plenty of light and air while still keeping the office area removed from the rest of the house.

This amazing room divider actually hides an entire room away. Just fold in the wall and create a perfect cozy reading nook. Fold it away for sleep without distraction.

Sliding doors are another creative room divider option. These are made from reclaimed wood and can be left open for air flow and space or closed off for privacy.

Sliding doors are another creative room divider option. These are made from reclaimed wood and can be left open for air flow and space or closed off for privacy.

A bit less privacy is possible with these wooden slat sliding doors, but the elegant appearance more than makes up for it.

A bit less privacy is possible with these wooden slat sliding doors, but the elegant appearance more than makes up for it.
Using a massive bookshelf to divide a room is a great practical use of space as seen here. The more books you amass, the more separate things get.

Using a massive bookshelf to divide a room is a great practical use of space as seen here. The more books you amass, the more separate things get.
This low marble wall conceals an office space and also acts as a mount for a flatscreen.

This low marble wall conceals an office space and also acts as a mount for a flatscreen.
Gauzy white curtains don't do much to keep out noise, but sometimes the suggestion of division is enough to make a space more comfortable.

Gauzy white curtains don’t do much to keep out noise, but sometimes the suggestion of division is enough to make a space more comfortable.
Installing an entire wall is not always an option. This large panel only affixes in a few places, making installation and removal easy. As you can see, it also gives a perfect place to display art.

Installing an entire wall is not always an option. This large panel only affixes in a few places, making installation and removal easy. As you can see, it also gives a perfect place to display art.
Another easily installed piece, these wooden slats take inspiration from Japanese design and perfectly separate the dining area from the breakfast nook in this simply elegant home.

Another easily installed piece, these wooden slats take inspiration from Japanese design and perfectly separate the dining area from the breakfast nook in this simply elegant home.
Of course, there are also those times that intricacy wins out over simplicity, like in the delicately carved wood partition.

Of course, there are also those times that intricacy wins out over simplicity, like in the delicately carved wood partition.
This medal room divider appears almost pixelated, letting it blend easily with the industrial design of this urban loft.

This medal room divider appears almost pixelated, letting it blend easily with the industrial design of this urban loft.
geometric room divider
Some room dividers are more nightclub than midcentury. The gold sparkles in this handing curtain are brash and playful in a glorious middle eastern way.
These luxurious beaded curtains would never be found in a dorm.
Part art installation, part partition, this bright snowflake design also has pockets for reading material or other décor.

Part art installation, part partition, this bright snowflake design also has pockets for reading material or other décor.
Decidedly mod, almost like a martini olive, this room divider is fun and funky without devolving into kitsch.

Decidedly mod, almost like a martini olive, this room divider is fun and funky without devolving into kitsch.
Perfectly contemporary, this artistic white partition suggests separation more than it actually separates.

Perfectly contemporary, this artistic white partition suggests separation more than it actually separates.
No one said a room divider had to be boring. This pink plush tunnel makes it a bit more fun for kids to share a room.

No one said a room divider had to be boring. This pink plush tunnel makes it a bit more fun for kids to share a room.
The waterfall effect in this partition is ultra luxurious.

The waterfall effect in this partition is ultra luxurious.
Nautical and modern, this rope room divider is actually a fairly easy DIY.

Nautical and modern, this rope room divider is actually a fairly easy DIY.
Using shelving to divide a room also offers extra storage and display space.

Using shelving to divide a room also offers extra storage and display space.
In this urban space, the kitchen itself acts as a central divider.

In this urban space, the kitchen itself acts as a central divider.
Sliding glass doors don't give a lot of privacy, but they do give a lot of contemporary elegance.

Sliding glass doors don’t give a lot of privacy, but they do give a lot of contemporary elegance.
The wood slats that float up with this staircase are a beautiful design element in this wood heavy home.

The wood slats that float up with this staircase are a beautiful design element in this wood heavy home.
Taking the partition to the next level, this particular en suite does not even have a whole wall separating the bedroom from the bath, instead using frosted glass.

Taking the partition to the next level, this particular en suite does not even have a whole wall separating the bedroom from the bath, instead using frosted glass.

Translucent walls separate a concrete hallway from a contemporary living room with a Japanese flair.

Translucent walls separate a concrete hallway from a contemporary living room with a Japanese flair.
Photo credits: INTERIOR DESIGN IDEAS

If you have an area in your home where you feel a room divider or partition could enhance your space, please send me an email at me@nancymeadowsdesigns.com. I’d love to help you design one that’s perfect for you and your home.

Until next time…

Blessings from my home to yours,

Nancy

Dedicated to helping you live your rooms—not the other way around

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How many boxes/albums of photos do you have in a forgotten closet? If you’re like me, too many to count. We always think organizing them is something we’ll get to—sometime. The mere idea however, is daunting and we put it off for another day which never arrives.

Today’s photos are digital and easier to manage, but I remember all the years before when this technology didn’t exist. I still have a “Brownie” camera if you can believe it, which I’ve saved as memorabilia from my past.

This week’s article will help you to organize your photo collection more easily. The photos are from HOUZZ and the article was written by JENNIFER PHELPS, HOUZZ CONTRIBUTOR.

Keep calm and focus. Many people are loath to part with any photographs — the good, the bad and the ugly. But there are way too many to keep organized; this is how you got into this pickle in the first place. 

Now don’t panic. I’m not going to tell you to toss out all of your photos. But to truly honor your memories, you’re going to have to extricate the most precious images from that stack of space wasters. And, like any organizing project, if it feels daunting to do all at once, do it just a few minutes a day or one box at a time, and I promise that little by little, you’ll get it done.

The practical rule of thumb. Dispose of photos that are duplicates, blurry, of people or events you don’t remember, and multiples of the same group (people, pets, palm trees, whatever …) in slightly different poses. 

In fact, you really need to keep only a few images that best document your experience of any given event. While the practical approach may feel cold until you get in the groove, you’ll feel rewarded when you start uncovering long-lost gems. Sort by these categories: keep, toss, give away, and digitize (so you know you’ll never lose your favorites).

The emotional rule of thumb. Practical rules apply in photo organizing, but the fact is that this is an inherently subjective process. I tell my clients to go with their gut when choosing which photos to keep. If that blurry photo best captures the feel of the event, then that’s the one to keep. 

Choose a funky little snapshot that brings you right back to that day over a gallery-quality image that stirs no emotion whatsoever. Choose the one or two shots that make you feel the ocean breeze and smell the coconut oil, and confidently toss the ones that don’t blow your hair back. And even if you know your mother would be embarrassed by a certain picture of her, if it captures a facet of her personality that you love, then keep it.

What if I don’t like seeing pictures of myself? Sorting photos of ourselves is a touchy business. The good news is that the person who has the photos has the power to present history in a complimentary light – your best light. However, if you intend to pass these photos on to your kids, please see the last sentence in the previous paragraph. If you absolutely cannot be objective, just keep the ones you like.
What if someone else might want them? Not sure if someone else will want the photos you’re purging? Ask and then pass them on right away, rather than storing them any longer. Keep in mind that the point of this exercise is to preserve the good stuff. It doesn’t serve anyone to pass along a mess. 

What if not all of my photos are of happy memories? If some pictures dredge up negative feelings, consider saving them only if it’s important to you to keep a true journal of your life in pictures, but definitely toss them if you’d rather flush the memories of certain people or events.

Your photo collection should be something that brings you joy, a chronicle of people and experiences you want to remember, not just more clutter and guilt. Chip away at the resistance and chip away at the extras. Once your pile is manageable, you’ll be ready for step two: choosing a storage system that lets you enjoy your photos and the lifetime of memories they hold.

Until next time…

Blessings,

Nancy

Dedicated to helping you live your rooms—not the other way around

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As a book lover, to me, they’re also one of the best accessories a home can have.

Not Kindle books, but real ones that we can hold, touch, smell, and where we can physically turn the pages as we learn and are inspired by their words and pictures.

Books are also welcoming. They have an inherent warmth that beckons us into a space while they also share a lot about who we are, what we care about, and our take on the world.

The challenge is how to display them so that they become a natural and flowing part of the room’s overall design.

Here are some photos that show different ideas on how to successfully accomplish this.

The fact is that no matter how much you love your books, you can only read one at a time. This shelving unit takes advantage of that fact by adding depth rather than width. Books can be stacked two deep so that less wall space is necessary for twice as many books.

The fact is that no matter how much you love your books, you can only read one at a time. This shelving unit takes advantage of that fact by adding depth rather than width. Books can be stacked two deep so that less wall space is necessary for twice as many books.
modern corner shelving
This urban industrial apartment has vaulted ceilings, but in most cases, that just means a lot of empty space above your head. The massive shelving unit takes full advantage of the extra area, letting you stack books all the way up to the top and including a ladder for quick, if precarious access to every level.

This urban industrial apartment has vaulted ceilings, but in most cases, that just means a lot of empty space above your head. The massive shelving unit takes full advantage of the extra area, letting you stack books all the way up to the top and including a ladder for quick, if precarious access to every level.
huge shelves
In another example of taking advantage of high ceilings, these built in shelves are nestled completely into the wall, making for a sincerely impressive display.

In another example of taking advantage of high ceilings, these built in shelves are nestled completely into the wall, making for a sincerely impressive display.
colorful shelving

Just because you have access to a lot of shelving does not mean that every inch needs to be full of books. These shelves are instead carefully curated with books, magazine, and various knick-knacks for display. The result is both storage and decor.
built in shelves
While the more accident prone among us may hesitate to live somewhere with so many white surfaces, for those that can manage it, it can be truly serene. Here we do not see a massive shelving unit, rather in keeping with the minimalist style of the space, a few shelves float on the wall.

While the more accident prone among us may hesitate to live somewhere with so many white surfaces, for those that can manage it, it can be truly serene. Here we do not see a massive shelving unit, rather in keeping with the minimalist style of the space, a few shelves float on the wall.

These modern shelves leave a lot of negative space, calling attention to the look of the books rather than of the shelves themselves. The open backs and oversized height of the shelves let the beautiful brick wall shine through but still give a space for all that reading material.

These modern shelves leave a lot of negative space, calling attention to the look of the books rather than of the shelves themselves. The open backs and oversized height of the shelves let the beautiful brick wall shine through but still give a space for all that reading material.

Photos: INTERIOR  DESIGN IDEAS

If you would like help in designing beautiful ways to display your books, please email me at: me@nancymeadowsdesigns.com. I’d love to help.

Until next time…

Blessings,

Nancy

Dedicated to helping you live your rooms—not the other way around

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Until eight years ago, I lived in rental apartments most of my adult life. There wasn’t one that I didn’t put my “stamp” on to make it a reflection of how I needed my spaces to flow, function, and feel.

I never had a problem with the landlord. By paying my rent on time and always discussing ahead of time what I wanted to do and assuring them it would be in good taste, I experienced no opposition.

In fact, I improved the property. I signed long term leases because I knew I could be happy there and I treated the unit as if I did own it.  These are all pluses for a landlord.

Too often, renters feel because they don’t own the property and there’s a feeling of it being a “temporary” living space why bother.

The problem with this is they cheat themselves from having a home that truly nurtures and supports their life.

Your home, whether it’s a rented studio, large apartment or home is, in fact, your home and you deserve to feel “at home” in that space.

Six Ideas That Can Customize Your Rental

CHANGE LIGHT FIXTURES. You can replace existing fixtures (use an electrician for this) with your own. Sometimes a landlord will pay for this if they need to be replaced. If not, when you leave just exchange them with the original ones.

WINDOW TREATMENTS. Many apartments today come with aluminum blinds that are not that attractive. Think of replacing them with Roman shades, or even stationery panels that can be placed on either side of the windows. A valence can be added across the top as well.

WALLS. Nothing changes the look and feel of a space faster than paint color. You can also add decorative molding for very little money. When you leave, it’s very easy to repair the small nail holes.

Other ideas for walls include removable wall paper, hanging fabric, and of course, artwork.

FLOORING. Sometimes existing wood floors and carpet truly need replacing or refinishing. Landlords will generally absorb the cost of this project. Otherwise, large area rugs or carpet tiles are just what the “design doctor” ordered.

KITCHEN. Painting cabinets can give a new fresh look to this room. If that’s not possible, just replacing the hardware can update the entire space.

BATHROOM. Add a Roman shade it there’s a window, change out the hardware, replace an old dated mirror, and add or change lighting.  This was one room where I always did something with the light fixtures in order to have flattering lighting for applying makeup. Ladies, you know what I mean here!

CLOSETS AND BUILT-INS. Sometimes landlords will help with adding built-ins because it improves the property for future tenants.  Otherwise, modular systems can be installed and removed when you leave.

Take a look at these photos and you’ll see examples of the suggestions I’ve given.

 

Lighting
Windows
Flooring
Bath
Closets and Built-ins

Always remember, your home is your touchstone, your special and sacred space. May it always be set up to foster great memories and a place where you feel happy and comfortable.

If you need help in designing an apartment to fit your unique needs, please email me at me@nancymeadowsdesigns.com. I’d love to help you.

Until next time…

Blessings,
Nancy

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Too many homes, condos, and apartments have been built in the last few decades that are cookie-cutter; looking pretty much the same—bland, boring and too many square-shaped, boxy rooms.

They’re not really life-enhancing spaces beyond the basics.

But we want more than that. We want our homes to have character; to be distinctive. No matter the size.

We want the space we call home to possess a degree of enticement, interest, and an element of surprise. A bit of the unexpected is a good thing, too.

We don’t consider ourselves bland and boring, so why would we want our home to reflect that. No, a thousand times no.

So if you find yourself looking around such a room and wondering how you can bring your excitement to it, take a look at these photos. It just may spark a few ideas, and there are many others. Every room in your home should make you say, “I’m so glad this is where I live!” It just takes mindful design.

This shabby-chic styled kitchen has used an old weathered door placed onto a wall. You can find architectural salvage shops where you can find all manner of pieces that can add so much interest to a room.

I added a fireplace mantel and surround in an apartment I lived in. I placed tiles on top of the existing carpet and backed it with mirror and instead of dried branches seen in this photo, I used candlesticks of varying heights. Great fun.

I’ve used molding like this for several clients. It’s easy and it’s very inexpensive. Purchase the custom cut-to-order molding at a lumber yard or a big box store. They can be painted or even left the same color as the walls. It adds so much architectural interest to a room.

modern kids by Nicole Lanteri

Who said all closets need boring wood sliding doors?  Sometimes, a beautiful fabric curtain can be just what the decorator ordered.

There’s no window behind this bed. Adding a curtain wall adds elegance and texture. It’s hung just below the ceiling giving a feeling of more height.

 

This small studio space uses curtains to separate the sleeping area. They’re applied to the ceiling on a track and they’re crisply pleated giving a neat finished look. Also love the bursts of color that bring this all-white room to life.

There’s so much color and texture in this living room, that you don’t notice its boxy shape. For all of the color, the same shades are used throughout the pieces so it’s not jarring to the eye.

This is a small square bedroom, but the mirrored closet doors double the space. The papered focal wall along with the mirrored nightstands, lamps, and ceiling fixture add glamour and understated elegance.

Wallpaper with double-sided tape has been used to the closet sliding door to add interest. This application can be added to any surface such as tabletops, drawer fronts, headboards, and book shelves. The best part? If you tire of it, it’s easily removed with no damage to surfaces. If you want a more permanent fix? Decoupage.

A quiet elegant box of a room that uses a darker paint color to create a focal wall and the large standing light fixture is unexpected, giving this living room an element of surprise.

Until next time…

Blessings,
Nancy

P.S. If you have some thoughts, but you’re not sure, please send me an email. I’d love to help. Remember, you deserve a home that has the essence of  you written all over it.

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DRAMATIC DECOR: 10 DIFFERENT WAYS TO USE ROOM SCREENS IN YOUR HOME

In last week’s post I shared with you the many benefits of using screens to add drama to your room.

This week, you’ll see 10 different examples of how they can be used.  Another plus of using a decorative screen in your home design is they don’t have to be permanent. You may enjoy changing things around in your home. A decorative screen is easily removed and you may decide to give it a new home in another of your rooms.

The photos are from HOUZZ. Enjoy!

Use a pair to add symmetry. These ornate room screens add glitz and Hollywood Regency style to this formal living room. Flanking the fireplace with them also adds balance and symmetry.
contemporary living room by Marcelo Brito Design

by Marcelo Brito Design
Adapt a room screen into a portable accent wall. This geometric room screen enlivens this white wall without a big commitment. It adds an exotic pattern and creates a backdrop for the console table.
Here a room screen in a very different style adds some shine and dimension to a beige wall. Note the way the light reflects off the metallic gold finish on the screen.
Create a transparent division between rooms. All right, so this example is a little more permanent than I implied in the introduction, but I could not leave it out. This beautiful built-in screen helps delineate the boundary between the living room and the dining room in a very open floor plan. It also adds wood, vertical lines, and a bit of Japanese-inspired style to the space.
Bring on the Zen with shoji screens. Shoji screens are a common Japanese design element that let in the light and add to the calm, spa-like feeling of this bathroom.
Imply a separate space without actually closing things off. This Art Nouveau screen provides a sense of separation for this loft’s sleeping area.
This room has three beds in it, and each bed has an Eames screen beneath it so that the girls can grab a little privacy from each other.
Bring dead space back to life. This screen draws our eye down the center of the room to the corner, which would be a dead spot without it.
Add print and pattern to a room. This room screen adds botanical artwork to the space, and hems in the living area a bit, making it feel more intimate.

Check out the rest of this collected loft.

Similarly, this screen adds a healthy dash of Chinoiserie to this traditional room. It also enlivens a dead corner and creates a good spot for intimate conversations.
Create a sculptural piece. Intricate and exotic screen panels can function as sculpture when mounted on the wall.
Fashion one into a headboard. This exotic and intricately carved screen has serves as a unique headboard that adds a layer of global style to the room.
contemporary media room by Seura

Add reflection to the room. This pair of screens keeps the television from floating in a sea of wallpaper, and its mirrored shapes create interesting reflections that bounce light around.

Did any of these photos spark creative ideas for your home?

You can also have a custom designed decorative room screen that is uniquely yours. Email me at me@nancymeadowsdesigns.com if you’d like to explore the many possibilities for your one of a kind screen; your
design, your budget.

Until next time…

Blessings,

Nancy

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DRAMATIC DECOR USING ROOM SCREENS

I love room screens. They add drama to a room, delineate spaces, and bring life to dull corners. Consider screens as a piece of sculptural art in your home. They’re available in many designs and work equally well in contemporary or traditional spaces.

Following are some fabulous screens shown in HOUZZ. You’ll see where they can be found in the lower right hand corner of each photo.

Warning: They are not inexpensive, but sometimes just one financial splurge can completely change the feeling of a room and give you that WOW factor which is so much fun. Both for you and your guests!

I am a big art deco fan, and this fanciful five-panel screen would do justice to any sophisticated living room.
Modern design is always seeking ways to reinvent how we function in a space. This felt Softwall was created to divide up an area in a room or office and to function as a storage wall for small, infrequently used objects. Pretty clever, no?
If your design bent is art nouveau, these screens are just the thing for you. The sinuous tendrils are hand-carved out of walnut by noted woodworker Phillip Lloyd Powell.
This is yummy Murano elegance in a 1960s multicolored glass screen from Venini. This would make me ooh and ah if I saw it hanging in a room.
There’s no need to go to the museum for a Picasso fix. Just put this creative floor screen in a corner of your living room and voilà!
A Higgins Glass Rondelay wall screen is a delight to behold. The glass pieces were all made in the 1960s, so this piece has some history. Letting it hang from the ceiling creates a mesmerizing room divider for all to behold.
This room divider has yellow lacquered shelves that tilt out. It’s sort of a screen-meets-bookshelf. Designed by Gaetano Pesce in 1982, there is a lot of design bang for the buck in this little beauty.

Next week, in Part 2, I’ll share some examples of how to incorporate screens in your home.

Until next time…

Blessings,
Nancy

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Last week I shared tips for organizing your bathroom and laundry room.  This week’s article moves onto the bedroom and kitchen, specifically the refrigerator.

BEDROOMAN ORGANIZED BEDROOM MAKES MORNINGS A BREEZE
It seems like when your bedroom is organized, your whole day just starts out better. You sleep better, you feel more relaxed and less stressed and anxious. Another added benefit, you may just find you want to spend more time alone with your spouse/significant other!  Having a room in which to enjoy each others company, without having things in the way, may open the door for more enjoyment. Follow these tips on how to keep your bedroom from becoming a catch-all. Your life will thank you for it.

DON’T LET TRASH CLUTTER UP YOUR SPACE
This sounds so simple and easy, right? But how many of us just throw receipts, clothing tags and other scraps of paper on the dresser, night stand, or in a chair—thinking we’ll pick that up later? A good idea is to have a waste container by the bed or in a corner of the room. By just seeing it,you’ll use it immediately, rather than letting it become a piece of clutter in your bedroom.

DON’T LET YOUR CLOTHES TAKE OVER
If the laundry is dirty, place it in the hamper. When it becomes full, take it to the laundry room and start the wash. If the laundry has been done and is clean, hang it up or fold immediately. Not only will this keep your bedroom organized, but it will save you hours of ironing time later.

MAKE GETTING READY EASIER BY KEEPING AN ORGANIZED CLOSET
Clothes crammed together, shoes piled in a corner, hamper overflowing? Not a good way to start your day. A neat and organized closet makes getting up and out of the house a lot faster and far less stressful.  No matter what your current closet set-up is, chances are you can make it better with just a few simple changes.

I’ve found that purchasing a closet organizing system is the best way to tame a chaotic closet. It’s just terrific for separating and hanging clothing, belts, and accessories. By hanging all of these things up and keeping them tidy, you know at a glance what you have and can easily find what you want. Need I say how much time this saves, not to mention frustration?

AVOID THE TEMPTATION TO JUST “TOSS IT ON THE BED”
When we’re in a hurry, it’s easy to toss things on the bed. The shirt you changed your mind about wearing, the sweater left in the car, the handbag you changed—it all adds up.

Keep your bed clear from clutter. Make your bed the most comfy, relaxing, inviting space in the room.

UntitledAN ORGANIZED FRIDGE IS THE START OF AN ORGANIZED KITCHEN
Did you know that by properly organizing your refrigerator, you can save both time and money? By holding the door open and starring into the cold abyss, you cause more loss of cold air. As a result, the refrigerator will consume more energy and have to run longer to keep it cool. Keep your fridge organized and you’ll be able to reach in and get what you need instantly. Not only that, but you’ll be well on your way to an organized kitchen.

MEAL PLANNING
Create a specialized place for copies of your meal plans. This will help you to organize the contents of your refrigerator better by reminding you to use leftovers and also by ensuring you have everything you need on hand when it’s time to cook.

INVEST IN CLEAR STORAGE CONTAINERS WITH LIDS
It’s easier to find what you’re looking for when you see what’s in the containers.

If your leftovers are often thrown away because you forgot to eat them, you might want to label the containers and date them. Rotate the contents of your fridge so older food is in the front. This tip keeps spoilage to a minimum.

PLACE MEAT AND POULTRY IN BOWLS
Be sure and clean all meat first before placing it in the fridge. Some might contain bacteria that can spread inside the refrigerator. Get rid of excess blood. Cut the meat into the portions that you can use during the week and place in a bowl with a covered lid.

ORGANIZE FOOD BY DAY OF THE WEEK
Place the food that you’re going to eat later in the week at the back of the fridge and organize the items you need earlier that week in the areas where you can easily get them.

PLACE DAIRY ITEMS TOGETHER
Avoid storing dairy products where you can’t easily find them. These perish easily. Keep cheeses, yogurt, sandwich spreads, and milk close to the door of the refrigerator so you can easily see them.

CLEAN YOUR FRIDGE REGULARLY
Every few weeks go through the refrigerator and clean it out, throwing out leftovers that were not eaten and wiping down shelves where food has spilled on them. Wipe off bottle lids that have food dripped on the sides and check the temperature settings frequently.

An organized home lowers anxiety levels, and improves your quality of life. You have more time to spend with loved ones and more time to do what you want to do without that nagging feeling that you need to be more organized.

Until next time…

Blessings,
Nancy

 

Images courtesy requintedecor & kevinmarsh
Closet organizing systems, organized bedrooms, organized
kitchens, refrigerators, home organization tips
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