Over the years, I’ve helped many moms refresh their homes when the last child leaves the nest to start the next chapter in their lives.
 
After a period of mourning with the realization that an important chapter of their lives is over, they want to re-do the home in some way now that it’s a child-free zone once again.
 
Something wonderful happens with fresh starts. There’s excitement that comes with realizing new possibilities and no where is this more evident than the design of your home.
 
You’ve reached a new stage in your life—a place you’ve not been before. Your home needs to fit where you are now in your life and support your new goals.
 
Here are 9 ways that can help you with this transition and give both you and your home a fresh new start.
 
CLEARING THE CLUTTER
organized closetorganized closet
It’s amazing how much clutter accumulates over the years, especially in areas like closets, drawers, the attic, basement and garage. You’ll have saved many things of the kids that really don’t need to be kept. You’ll probably find things of the children that they no longer will use or need as well. Now’s a good time to go through it all and discard.Be ruthless. You’ll feel giddy with joy and a wonderful sense of accomplishment when you’re through.
 
YOUR CHILD’S ROOM
He/she may be off to college but they;ll have breaks when they want to come home and have their room waiting for them. Change enough so you can use the space for your own needs, but leave enough so your child still feels welcome. Once they’ve graduated, all bets are off and that room becomes a space to do with as you please.
 
TIME TO RETIRE THE SECTIONAL
A useful piece of furniture while the kids were growing up. Now, however, might be the perfect time to replace it with smaller, cozier pieces. Consider a sofa and love seat, 2 smaller sofas, or a sofa and comfortable chairs.
 

HOME PROJECTS

After putting off renovations, now is the time to remodel your bathroom or kitchen. You’ve wanted to for years, but kept postponing it until the children were gone. No better time like the present to have that spa bathroom or a kitchen a chef would love to cook in.
 
SMALL CHANGES
You may not need a remodel. It may be that re-covering your sofa, changing out your bed linens, adding new accessories, or changing your paint colors is all you need for a design/decor face lift.
 
CREATE A GUEST SPACE
Your child’s bedroom can also be used as a guest room when it would otherwise stay vacant. Another idea is to replace the bed with a sleeper sofa and create a home office.
 
CREATE A BRAND NEW SPACE
You’ve wanted your very own personal library forever, or a special room to enjoy your hobbies. A perfect way to miss your child a little less is to give this space new life with a new purpose.
 
ENJOY THE LIGHTNESS OF BEING
You’ve always wanted a light-colored carpet and white furniture. You would never have indulged this desire while the children were growing up, but now you can. You’re free to decorate your home without restraints. Go for it. You’ve surely earned it!
 
If you or someone you know is facing the empty nest syndrome and would like help giving your home a free-at-last renewal, please email me at me@ nancymeadowsdesigns.com. I’d love to help you.
 
Until next time…
 
Blessings from my home to yours,
 
Nancy
Dedicated to helping YOU live your rooms—not the other way around
 
Photos via ELLE decor
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Picture a 3-legged stool, then imagine it’s missing 1 leg. The stool becomes unbalanced and cannot securely stand.
 
Now give a name to each leg—Feel, Function, and Flow. These 3 “F” words are what is required in order for a home to be the happy and fulfilling place it’s meant to be.
 
You know your home needs to be esthetically pleasing and proper function goes without saying.
 
However, if you are constantly nursing bruises from bumping into a coffee table or furniture edges, you’re painfully reminded of that 3rd. leg—flow—or lack thereof.
 
When you have good flow in a space, you can easily move about and have a comfortable feeling. Without it, you’re not relaxed; it discourages productivity; and doesn’t support the activities you wish to do in that room.
 
The reasons for poor flow are usually having too much furniture, or furniture that is larger than the space allows for.
 
Ask yourself 3 questions if you think you have this design dilemma:
  • Can you freely move around the room?
  • Can you easily move through all the passages to the space?
  • Can you use all the room has to offer with ease?
Answering no to any of these questions means the function and feel of a room will be comprised as well.
 
Following are suggestions that can eliminate this and give you a “stool” that is fully supported—each working in sync with the other 2.
 
Take a look.
 
 

DINING ROOM

 
Allow 36 inches between dining chairs and the wall so guests can easily move chairs in and out. Provide approximately 48 inches between the table and entrance to the room so movement isn’t impeded.
 
Contemporary Dining Room by Elevation
Plan 24 inches between chairs so guests aren’t bumping elbows every time they move.
 
BEDROOM
 
Contemporary Bedroom by Erika Bierman Photography
Leave 30-36 inches of room on each side of the bed so you’re not bumping into furniture in the dark. Make sure walk space is open going into the bathroom or hallway for the same reason.
Contemporary Bedroom by Alma-nac
If your bedroom is small and narrow, consider placing a shelf behind the head of the bed.
 
Caveat: If you live in earthquake country as I do, make sure any items on the shelf are secured.
 
LIVING ROOM
 
Contemporary Living Room by Cheryl Ketner Interiors
If your living room is tight, a round coffee table can improve flow.
 
                                    Or
 
Contemporary Living Room by Folio Design London
Another choice is an irregular-shaped one which also offers no sharp edges.
 
Contemporary Family Room by Décor Aid
Choose smaller pieces of furniture like these chairs and stools. You can seat more people and still have the proper scale and avoid a cramped-looking room.
 
BATHROOMS
 
Modern Bathroom by Affecting Spaces
My favorite trick in a small bathroom is to replace a swing door with a pocket door if there’s room inside of the wall. If you can’t add a pocket door, consider a barn-style door.
 
Contemporary Bathroom by Ira Frazin Architect
The same idea applies to the shower door. Install a sliding glass shower door to replace a swing-open door.
 
KITCHEN
 
Contemporary Kitchen by Roundhouse
I know most of us love kitchen islands, but make sure you have 42 inches between the island and the counter for easy movement.
 
Contemporary Kitchen by Mackenzie Pronk Architects
Same idea if you have a dining table and seating at an island. Both sets of  chairs/stools should be able to slide back without hitting each other.
 
HOME OFFICE
 
Contemporary Home Office by Blackbox design studios
If you’ve carved out space in a nook to use as a home office, allow 42 inches of room to slide your chair in and out from the desk. Otherwise, you may feel like you can’t breathe.
 
HALLWAY
 
Contemporary Living Room by Andrea Hubbell Photography
All hallways and walk-through areas need to be clear of obstructions for obvious reasons.
Contemporary Dining Room by Hall Smith Office_Architecture
When your entire home has good flow, everything becomes easier in ways big and small. Take the time to create a space plan. You’ll love your home so much more and it’ll fit you like a soft kidskin glove.
 
If you’re having challenges with the flow in your home, email me at: me@nancymeadowsdesigns.com and let’s talk about it and find solutions.
 
Until next time…
 
Blessings from my home to you yours,
 
Nancy
Dedicated to helping you live your rooms—not the other way around
 
Photos via HOUZZ
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Lakeside LivingEvery year at this time, after putting away holiday decorations, I get this urge to de-clutter my home.
 
I think it’s because it is a brand new year and I want my home environment to be as clean and unfettered as the pages so far are on the calendar.
 
I hadn’t given thought to the why it feels so good after de-cluttering until reading a blog bu Shifrah Combiths. It makes perfect sense and with this new understanding, it will make it easier to stay de-cluttered even after the pages of my calendar start filling up.
 
Here are Shifrah’s 4 feel good reasons to de-clutter and 1 more of my own recommendations.:
 

Physical space and mental space go hand-in-hand. Clutter is visual noise, and the disarray creeps into our mental faculties as well (for some of us more than others). So it stands to reason that clearing out our physical spaces, making room for air and light and growth, would be mirrored in our psyches as well. Just think how much better you work when your desk is cleaned off — now extend that to your life.

Separating from the past can heal us. We hang onto so many things because of the memories tied to them. When we de-clutter, we have the opportunity to interact not only with our physical possessions, but with the memories and feelings they trigger. This can be negative but cathartic, as when we let go of things we’ve held onto out of fear of letting go or of not being in control. The act of getting rid of these things can be painful but is nevertheless triumphant, inspiring a feeling of this has no hold on me!! as things are discarded. I think watching this interplay between our things and our personal histories is what had me hooked on Hoarders for a time.

Making decisions makes us strong. When we make a decision about something, even something as small as whether to keep those curtain rods, we do gain some control, and the feeling is addicting and self-perpetuating. If you can donate years’ upon years’ worth of children’s clothes, for instance, you’re not only making room mentally and physically. You’re also empowered to tackle that next thing that’s been hanging over you or crowding your consciousness: exercising, asking your boss for a raise, copying your pictures off your phone, whatever.

You have less stuff to deal with. This is the most obvious reward of getting rid of stuff, and most definitely not the smallest. Each thing that goes out your door is one less thing you have to find a place for, organize again and again, or clean. That, my friends, is freedom and boy does it feel good!

 
1 More recommendation:
 
UNFINISHED PROJECTS. If you’ve started a project , yet with all good intentions it remains unfinished, set a finish date or get rid of it. Otherwise you’ll feel guilty and dis-ease every time you look at it. Perhaps you lost interest or found a better idea. Either way, toss it!
 
What do you think? Let me know in the comments.
 
Until next time…
 
Blessings from my home to yours,
 
Nancy
Dedicated to helping you live your rooms—not the other way around
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Most of us know the negative physical and emotional toll that results when faced with a disorganized home.
A home in disarray creates chaos which leaves us feeling stressed and un-centered, leads to negative self-talk, and feeling physically tired. Not the Rx. for a happy home.
Knowing this, we endeavor at being organized. However, it’s so easy to fall off the track.
Our lives are so busy with more distractions than we know what to do with. Before we realize it, it’s happening: the dreaded signs of disorganization begin to creep in.
DANICA ROG shared with FRESHOME.COM 9 ways that highly organized people do in order to have a home that is tidy, warm, comfortable and works to the benefit of all who live there.
These ideas promise to streamline your life and how great is that.

They have a place for everything

Put things where they’re used, not where there is space

When it comes to fighting clutter, the most important thing that organized people do is make room for items in the location they’re used, not where there is space. Stamps stay near the bills in the home office, stain remover stays in the laundry room.

The further your belongings are from where you use them means the more time and effort to retrieve them, and the less likelihood you’ll put them back once they’ve been used. Which is the last thing you want when you already have to pay a cable bill or remove a coffee stain.

They use tools

Mental notes are out, day planners are in.

Organized people schedule everything. They map out their days and weeks with calendars, whether online, in a planner, or both. They invest in the time to set a reminder or make a note, freeing up brain space to focus on what’s in front of you.

Going digital? Here’s a list of some great organizational apps.

minimalism organized people

Image: Nicole Hollis

They have less

The less there is, the less there is to organize.

It’s that simple. Organized homes aren’t filled with excess towels and sheets, or plates and dishes. They just have washing machines and dishwashers. If you can narrow down to just the necessities, you’re bound to be left only with the items you use regularly and love.

Having less of anything – whether wardrobe, board games, or pantry items, makes for easier choices.

gallery organized people

Image: Domus Nova

They know when to say, “good enough”

They’re not perfectionists, and don’t try to be.

Organization is so often associated with detail-orientation, but the two are not mutually exclusive. Organized people are the ones who are OK with putting slightly wrinkly sheets on the bed. They don’t have a five-star meal on the table each night. They get things done as efficiently as possible, allowing themselves to cut some corners to get to the next task at hand.

entry-way organized people

Image: Up Interiors

They put things away

Right away.

Author Gretchen Rubin wrote about her experiences trying to clear clutter and become more organized. Her two biggest successes: the one minute rule, and ten minute tidy-up.

The one minute rule declares any task that can be done in under a minute should be done immediately, from filing a record to hanging up a coat or umbrella. Then, every night before bed, she suggests taking ten minutes to tidy up visual clutter in your home. Can’t commit to ten? Start with five.

Staying on top of things little by little is much easier and rewarding than having to tackle your mess once it’s hit the point of no return.

They reevaluate

Often.

Lifestyles (and design styles) change, and the organized person is constantly combing through their belongings and deciding what isn’t needed anymore. In a world where we’re almost always accumulating things, we also have to consciously curate our items.

organized people

Image: Dyer Photo

They say no

And don’t think twice.

The invitation to a last minute happy hour, the extra task at work, the lamp from their mother-in-law. Organized people are OK with saying no to things that risk overloading them, whether physically or emotionally. Because the straw that broke the camel’s back shouldn’t be a lamp you didn’t even want in the first place.

They don’t hide their belongings

Out of sight isn’t out of mind.

The art of being organized isn’t the art of stowing away all of your items. In fact, keeping your belongings in plain sight or easily accessible makes them easier to find, use, and move on from. Keeping all of your possessions in boxes and drawers means more time and frustration spent digging.

Invest in some aesthetically-pleasing storage containers. For the kitchen, they’re great for storing cereals, nuts, and pastas (and making it easy to know when they’re running low). For elsewhere in the home, an assortment of sizes can contain kids toys, beauty accessories, even spare change.

They celebrate big and small achievements

A long list of big tasks is daunting to anyone.

Those who stay organized flourish by putting small, easy tasks on a to-do list. Mixing in simple tasks with difficult ones provides encouragement and shows progress as you make your way through the list.

And when tasks are overwhelmingly large, like doing your taxes or buying a new car, break it down into smaller, more digestible to-dos.

They aren’t easy side-tracked

Often times, multitasking (or attempting to) leads to less productivity overall. This is especially relevant living in a world where we constantly have a buzzing cellphone in hand and a full email inbox.

Organized people don’t feel the need to answer every email as they receive it. Instead, they ignore or turn off notifications for such distractions, and finish the task they’re currently in the middle of.

A study by the University of British Columbia said the average person checks email 15 times a day. However, the study suggests three times is all we need to keep added stress away and stay on track with other tasks.

Until next time…
Blessings from my home to yours,
Nancy,
Dedicated to helping you live your best life—not the other way around
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As an interior designer and lover of all things beautiful, I love re-purposing furniture. It’s not only good for the environment, but it can also be cost-effective, charming, and out-of-the-ordinary.
Here are 13 examples of unconventional bathroom vanities that have stepped out-of-the-box to find  new life in a different way than originally thought of. Take a look.
TIPS:
  • You will likely need a carpenter to re-configure drawers in order to accommodate the sink and plumbing. You also want to maintain as much storage area as possible.
  • If there is not a material like quartz, granite, etc., on the top of the furniture, apply a wood sealer such as used on boats to prevent water damage.
There you have it. Different ideas and different design styles for re-purposing a piece of furniture into a bathroom vanity. You may have an old piece in storage that you could use in this way. If not, and you like the idea, check out Craigslist, antique malls, or yard sales. You may be surprised at what treasures you find.
Until next time…
Blessings from my home to yours,
Nancy
Dedicated to helping you live your rooms—not the other way around
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Almost all homes being built today or re-modeled, have an open concept design. Simply put, the kitchen, dining, and living areas become one open space.
While still enormously popular, for this week’s post I’m going to play devil’s advocate and say this might not be the best floor plan for everyone. Here’s why:
.  For one thing, open floor plans can be difficult to decorate as it can be a challenge knowing
   how to best delineate the different spaces. Each area has a different function and there’s the
   risk of looking hodge-podge.
.  Secondly, there’s often little wall space for artwork and other decorative items.
.  Lastly, it’s difficult to create cozy, intimate areas.
What if it’s possible to have the best of both worlds? What if you could have separation without closing off? Achieve unity while still keeping definition? Have a slight separation of each area, yet allowing each its own personality and warmth?
It’s certainly possible as the following photos show. Take a look and see what you think.
In this photo, a fireplace wall subtly separates the living area from the kitchen and dining areas. It’s still open, but gives a feeling of privacy and specific use.
An open shelving partial wall allows light to pass through the spaces, while the wide door opening separates the different areas yet still connects them.
The home office is separated by using an internal window wall. Again, it’s still an open space, yet there’s a feeling of privacy while still being a part of the living area.
A wide opening separates the spaces while still being open to the connecting areas.
All of these examples show how different levels and in some cases different ceiling heights can create separate areas, yet still connected. Psychologically, you can feel alone if you wish, yet still a part of the different home activities.
A partial wall makes the function of each space easy to see and use accordingly while still being in an open space.
A half wall separates the living area from the kitchen. You can still be preparing meals while interacting with family and/or guests. Not every cook wants the mess of a kitchen to be shared.
Sliding doors may be the solution when you want or need privacy, yet still have the option to open completely keeping an open space plan.
These are excellent examples of a compromise between a large and completely open space and closed off individual rooms.
If one large open space is just too big and open for you, open yet separated areas could be the perfect solution.
Until next time…
Blessings from my home to yours,
Nancy
Dedicated to helping you live your rooms—not the other way around
Photos via HOUZZ
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Bookshelves come in every size and price point. While we think of them as the place to store books,they are also a piece of furniture that can wear many hats and serve you in ways you may not have thought of.
Take a look at these suggestions.

Think of the bookcase as a “frame” for art as seen in this photo.

Never go to bed without your books. See the rest of the home here.
Unless you live in earthquake country, a bookcase can serve as a headboard with bedside reading lamps attached to the unit.
Cocktails, anyone? They're extra easy to fix when the makings are nicely organized, as they are in this bookshelf-turned-bar, spotted on The Everygirl.
A small bookcase can be the perfect place to contain everything needed for making cocktails a breeze.
We love the way this bookcase does double duty as a console table – with the bonus of extra storage underneath.
A low bookcase can serve as a console table for artful displays while giving you storage space beneath.
Sometimes closet space just doesn't allow for a full shoe collection. On The Glitter Guide, bookshelves save the day as a display for shoes.
The perfect home for shoes. It stores them in an easy way to immediately see what you have as well as keeping them neat.
To divide an open space, pull your bookshelf away from the wall, library-style.
I love using bookcases as a room divider. It’s a great way to separate spaces in a multi-use room while still allowing light to flow through, and maintain an open feeling.
Your neatly folded fabrics and pillows look just as pretty on your bookcase as they do in your closet. See the rest of the space at Amber Interiors.
Not all linens need to be housed in a closed closet. If you have pretty ones and I know you do, why not display them? You can also easily find what you’re looking for at a glance.
Turn your bookcase to the side and pull up a chair. Voila! Instant office! Get the look here.
This bookcase is used for many things. Art, books, some live plants and the perfect place for a small desk, especially if space is an issue.
There's no reason you can't bring a bookcase into the bathroom. For a spa-like touch, place one towel in every cubby.
What better place to store all things that are needed in the bathroom. Easy to see and easy to grab. You’ll feel like you’re at the spa.
Don't want to design around your TV? A bookcase with a well-place sliding panel hides it from plain sight.
A bookcase can also be the perfect place to hide the T.V. when it’s not in use. A sliding panel easily covers it and you can add art to the front of the panel as well.
There you have it. Just a few ways that a bookcase can be added to any space in your home. They’re practical and add to the beauty of your interiors—even if they don’t hold books!
Until next time…
Blessings from my home to yours,
Nancy
Dedicated to helping you live your rooms—not the other way around
Photos courtesy ELLE Decor
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What price space? Many of us choose to live in a large city where in most cases, square footage is at a premium. Perhaps you’re downsizing and moving into the city in order to be close to great shopping, museums, theaters, fabulous restaurants, and excellent medical care.
No matter the reason, a smaller home will be your best choice both in terms of cost and convenience. Best of all, a smaller home requires less upkeep.
Smaller spaces, however, need clever design tricks to make your home functional, beautiful, and feel larger than it actually is.
Here are some HOUZZ examples that show you how:
COMBINING SMALL PIECES WITH REGULAR SIZE
Use stools and ottomans along with regular size furniture. They will give you more seating without taking up a lot of space. What you don’t want is all small-sized furniture. It will make the room appear even smaller
KEEPING COLOR UNIFORM

By using a paint color that is close in color to furniture fabric allows a blending into the room and gives the feeling of more space.

FLOATING CABINETRY

By keeping legs off of the floor, the eye sees less cluttered and feels more open.
GLASS OR ACRYLIC FURNITURE
Using glass or acrylic makes the furniture appear almost invisible. However, watch your legs when passing to avoid bumps and bruises!
ADD A MIRROR

The oldest design trick in the book, mirrors almost always double the illusion of space. Plus you receive the added advantage of bouncing light around the room.

TALL BOOKCASES
By taking bookcases all the way to the ceiling, the eye goes upward giving the appearance of a higher ceiling and more space. Also, adding another sofa across from the existing one would have cramped the space. The single chair is perfect.

EVERY BIT OF SPACE COUNTS

Modern Family Room by Scott Weston Architecture Design PL
If you have stairs, utilize the space underneath. In this space, it’s the perfect place for extra storage and who among us has too much of that? Especially true in a smaller home.
Until next time…
Blessings from my home to yours,
Nancy
Dedicated to helping you live your rooms—not the other way around
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Can you imagine any woman saying she has too many shoes?
Not gonna happen.
A bigger concern is storing our shoes so we can easily see what we have and not have a disorganized jumble on the closet floor.
Take a look at these suggestions for storing shoes  that can make your life easier and,consequently happier.
SIMPLE MOLDING AS HANGERS

Use molding as a “hanger” for shoes that have heels. They easily hook on making your shoes easy to store and see.

HALLWAY STORAGE

Particularly good for shoes that you put on and take off as you’re leaving and entering like walking/running shoes.

CUSTOM SHELVING

SHOE CUPBOARD
Transitional Closet by Acastrian Bespoke Fitted Furniture

Slanted shelves built into a linen closet is another way to neatly store shoes and keep them from being underfoot (pun intended!)

SIMPLE BOXES
by 2 Ivy Lane

Whether it’s the boxes your shoes came in or any sturdy box, take a photo and place on the front. A quick and efficient way to store your shoes and know at a glance which shoes are in each box.

CLEAR PLASTIC BOXES
Traditional  by Truorder

If you don’t want to take photos, clear acrylic boxes are another choice to house your shoes and clearly see what shoes are where.

HANGING BOOTS

Tall boots are difficult to store as they flop over and you have a jumbled pile to contend with. A great way to keep them organized is to hang them using trouser hangers.

TIP: Place a piece of foam between the hanger clip and the boot to prevent damaging the leather. Or, order from www.bootbutler.com a hanger designed especially for boots.   Available online or Bed Bath And Beyond.
Until next time…
Blessings from my home to yours,
Nancy
Dedicated to helping you live your rooms—not the other way around
Photos via HOUZZ
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If you’re like me, they stay in my phone. Then if I want to share one or print it out, I have to thumb back until I find it which can take time and too much patience.

I just ran across a product called Little Black Book and it’s a wonderful way to capture all of those special moments into a high quality, inexpensive photo book. Their website is www.artisanstate.com/photo-book/little-black-book.html
Take a look and see what you think.
Little Black Book
Flush Mount
I’m thinking of what wonderful gifts these little photo books would make.
Until next time…
Blessings from my home to yours,
Nancy
Dedicated to helping you live your rooms—not the other way around
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