“I love these pieces. Are they available in the same metal color?”
I recently overheard a customer at ZGallerie ask this question to the salesperson.
I don’t recall his answer but it got me to thinking that this may be something you’ve wondered about.
The answer is that you can mix different colored metals in the same space and it’s much more interesting when you do.
If the human eye sees everything as the same, in some ways it ends up seeing nothing because the eye becomes used to it. There are no surprises.
When we mix it up a bit, the eye sees the difference and it becomes more interesting; it’s unexpected.
This is primarily why a good interior designer doesn’t go into a showroom and order everything in matching pieces for a client.
There has to be some surprise. This is one reason you don’t quickly tire of a room.
The ideas is not to match, but compliment.
Take a look at these photos from Freshome and the reasons why they work.
Soon you’ll be mixing metals like a pro.

main

Metals like copper and steel have been on trend for some time now and are considered classics, but the new addition of rose gold to the metal mix has lightened up the look. A perfect example is Apple’s addition of rose gold to its iPhone 6 offerings.

iphone-6splus-colors

Rose gold couldn’t be a more perfect addition to tie in the mixed-metal look that’s coming in so strong for 2016. It’s made from a mixture of copper and gold alloy that’s warm yet modern. And it works perfectly with the colors of the year, including Pantone’s soft pastels and the leading paint companies’ off-whites.

When brass and gold started showing up in design magazines, the vibe was altogether retro. Adding a combination of metallic tones to the brass and gold look updates a room by elevating it from “Mad Men” vintage to 21st-century chic.

The fearless combination of metals adds a little sparkle and elegance to your home’s decor. And the combination is essential — gold and brass warm up the chilly effect of silver and platinum.

The best way to add the mixed-metal trend to your home is in small doses. A lamp or lighting fixture is the best way to add impact to a space. And whether it comes in the form of gilt, leafing, patina or mirrors, it’s not about in-your-face shine and sparkle, but more about luster and glow.

Here are some of the most striking ways to mix this trend into your home.

combo

If you love the metal trend so much you intend to use it boldly, keep the finishes subtle. Choose one high-gloss mirrored surface (such as the side table shown above) while selecting larger metal pieces that have a matte or hand-hewn look to them.

golden-bedroom

The gold-leaf wall panel offsets the high-gloss silver elements beautifully in the bedroom above. Think about the metals as yin and yang: combine shiny and matte, dark and light, warm and cool tones to create harmony and balance.

kitchen bar

There’s no need to spend a fortune on adding the metal look to your home in a permanent way. The kitchen above is successful because of the copper bar stools, metallic pendant and rose gold votive holder on the dining table. And adding smaller metallic elements in the form of accessories is a lot less expensive than an entire copper appliance suite.

living area

This living room has several metal elements: the sectional has chrome legs, a pendant lamp is brushed black pewter, and then there’s that striking gold table lamp in the corner. The combination of the three may not have sounded like a good idea on paper, but they work beautifully as an eclectic expression, illustrating that matching is sometimes boring.

mixed dining

The white backdrop of this open kitchen/dining space is a perfect color for the oversized rose gold pendants to shine. The chrome touches on the bar stools and dining chairs soften the wood tones of the dining table. Notice the balanced metal mix — the combination of brushed stainless steel (in the form of appliances) with polished chrome and the reflective pendants looks up to date.

Until next time…

Blessings from my home to yours,
Nancy
Dedicated to helping you live your rooms—not the other way around
Share and Enjoy:
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • del.icio.us
  • Digg
  • Reddit
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • Print
  • email
It’s that time again for paint companies to introduce their color of the year for 2016.
Benjamin Moore chose a shade called Simply White OC117 as their top trending color.
As with all colors, each of us has a visceral response. We hate a color or we love it. And sometimes we experience a neutral feeling; neither liking nor disliking.
Because Benjamin Moore chose white as their color of the year, I’ve chosen to list 10 reasons why this color could be the perfect one for you to paint your walls. If you already love it, these reasons will only highlight your choice. If you hate it, all the reasons in the world probably won’t change your mind.
However, if you’re on the fence about this color, these reasons might explain why it could be your color choice. By the way, while I love the color white, I have no Benjamin Moore stock!

SUPPORT CREATIVE ENDEAVORS

White remains constant in various light sources so there is no distraction with this neutral color. Consequently. it can favor concentration.

WHITE WORKS WELL WITH ALL COLORS

You can add any colors you choose into your room. It plays well with all colors.

WHITE AS THE BACKDROP FOR YOUR COLLECTIONS

Galleries and museums use white as their color choice because it doesn’t distract the eye. It allows whatever you’re displaying to take center stage.

OPEN FLOOR PLANS

If many rooms are seen in one glance, white is a foolproof way to co-ordinate all of the spaces into an integrated whole.

BLACK AND WHITE

This classic color combination is at once elegant, refined, sophisticated, and never, ever is considered out-of-style.

WHITE ALL YEAR ROUND

White works equally well in summer or winter. It has no season. You may choose to change various design elements that reflect a particular season, but you don’t have to change the wall color for those changes to work.

WHITE IS ALWAYS FRESH-LOOKING

It’s classic simplicity never fails and somehow it can help a room to look less cluttered.

WHITE WORKS FOR ALL DESIGN STYLES

No matter what your design style is, white walls will compliment it. White by it’s very nature doesn’t “fight” what surrounds it.

WHITE IS A VISUAL TRANQUILIZER

White’s ethereal quality is relaxing and a balm to the eye. It has the power to relax you in a totally subconscious way. It could be the perfect color to come home to after a busy and frenetic day.

ARCHITECT’S COLOR OF CHOICE

Architects choose white because it emphasizes an interior’s structure. You, too, might have architectural features that you want to bring attention to and the color white does that beautifully.
Photos via HOUZZ
Until next time…
Blessings from my home to yours,
Nancy
Dedicated to helping you live your rooms—not the other way around
Share and Enjoy:
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • del.icio.us
  • Digg
  • Reddit
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • Print
  • email
Color makes such a difference in a space, both visually and psychologically.
For this article, I’m focusing on an area you may not have thought of—your ceiling.
Generally, ceiling color is painted white because it is an accepted fact that a white ceiling makes a room feel larger.
Sometimes that is the wisest choice but not always. In fact, a vibrant ceiling color can impact your overall design in a wonderfully fresh way. It is also chic and sophisticated if done well.
A few things to mention are:
  • If you’re using a vibrant ceiling color, keep the walls a light color so the affect won’t be overwhelming.
  • Color will appear darker on the ceiling so test your choice by painting a large white poster board and attaching it to the ceiling with painter’s tape.
  • If the ceiling has any imperfections, use a flat white finish paint unless a skim coat is applied first.   Otherwise use a semi-gloss or high-gloss finish as it will bounce light throughout the room.
  • If you are using a flat finish paint,don’t use a darker color as the ceiling can appear dull and heavy-looking.
Check out these photos and then look up at your own ceiling and imagine what if?
(Photos via HOUZZ)
Until next time…
Blessings from my home to yours,
Nancy
Dedicated to helping you live your rooms—not the other way around
Share and Enjoy:
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • del.icio.us
  • Digg
  • Reddit
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • Print
  • email
Last week I talked about using wallpaper instead of paint for walls and/or ceiling.
This week I want to show you some ideas of using simple framing and wallpaper to create an art piece.
TOUCH INTERIORS
Framed wallpaper. A bright, circus-inspired diamond print paper from Cole & Son was used like a huge art installation in this vibrant living space. Using simple moldings painted to match the walls creates the look of a giant frame around the wallpaper. When to think of framed wallpaper: Framing wallpaper, either in actual frames, or using molding, is a great way to show off a bold, artistic paper without covering an entire wall.
Rather than papering an entire wall, the designer chose to use simple molding to cover just a portion of the wall. This paper is so bold, that an entire wall of it could have been overboard. Using molding, it becomes a huge art installation .
ALEXANDER JOHNSON PHOTOGRAPHY
Framed wallpaper is a fantastic and simple alternative to wall art or wallpapering the entire wall. The frame sizes can be customized as you or your designer sees fit. The pattern is repeated in the window treatment.
The framed wallpaper become the art pieces in this dining room. The design was repeated in the window treatments.
RACHEL OLIVER DESIGN, LLC
Lengths of wallpaper framed with basic wooden wall molding beef up the headboards of a pair of four-posters in this bedroom. A gorgeous F. Schumacher paper was used here, but you could frame a really pretty gift wrap for a budget take on this look.
In this photo, beautiful chinoiserie paper has been chosen as “headboards” for a guest room.
ELIZABETH GORDON
Go garden green. The inspiration for this dining room was a garden that’s framed by the room’s windows. “The clients wanted the majority of the house interiors to reflect the cool blues and greens found on property,” says designer Elizabeth Gordon.
In this example, wallpaper is applied only to the ceiling. How gorgeous is this living room?
THE UPWARD BOUND HOUSE by ELIZABETH BOMBERER
Painted the same color as the wall, the box molding is not a distraction for the large patterned wallpaper it frames. The result is big on drama. More ways with molding: Molding: Add Texture by Detailing Your Detail.
A dining room application where the frames are painted the same color as the walls. They almost disappear focusing your eyes on the paper design. Note: I would have painted the electrical outlet cover the same color as the walls for a seamless look.
SHOSHANA GOSSELIN
Create a multi-layered gallery – Secure some painted moulding to the wall to create frames, then layer box-framed trinkets on top of grass cloth wallpaper. It’s infinitely more interesting than a painted wall or single piece of art hung above the bed.
This last example uses framed grass cloth and framed real objects creating a 3-D effect. It’s used above the bed and on each side of the bed. Really beautiful.
These are just a few ideas of how wallpaper can be used to ARTfully enhance your interior decor in unusual ways.
Until next time…
Blessings from my home to yours,
Nancy
Dedicated to helping you live your rooms—not the other way around
Photos via HOUZZ
Share and Enjoy:
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • del.icio.us
  • Digg
  • Reddit
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • Print
  • email
As an interior designer, I love including metallic’s in every space. Whether it’s paint, wallpaper, or accents, metallic’s bounce light around a room and add that touch of glamour that can make you and your space feel special.
However, you don’t want your home to reflect Donald Trump’s where everything seems to sparkle with gold; so much (if you’ve ever seen photos) that you would practically need sunglasses to live there. There’s such a thing as “guilding the lily” to extreme.
JESSICA CUMBERBATCH ANDERSON interviewed for ELLEDECOR.COM interiot designer NATALIE KRAIEM for suggestions of using metallic’s in your interiors without going overboard.
Here are her 5 tips:

The trick with using metallic pieces and mirrors in a single space is to mix them with different, softer textures to balance them out, Kraiem says. “I love mixing in textures like mohair, velvet, and wool to let the metallic accents contrast and stand out on their own.

Keep the palette neutral.

When incorporating a lot of metallic pieces into a room, you’ll want to keep the color scheme fairly subdued. According to Kraiem, brass pairs nicely with darker colors such as black, navy and even purple or other jewel tones, while chrome, stainless and satin go nicely with more modern palettes such as gray, white and blue.

Mix it up.

It’s an age-old design debate, but Kraiem says mixing metals and finishes can be done to a stylish effect. “I like mixing polished brass with sterling silver and chrome,” she says. But generally speaking, you’ll want to use the same color metal (for example, gold) in different textures or finishes (polished brass, brushed brass, gold leaf, etc.). Mixing chrome with other silver metals such as brushed nickel or satin nickel, is another way to go.

Stick with the classics.

Although copper is having a moment in kitchens and lighting right now — it’s especially cool in a hammered texture, Kraiem notes — brass, chrome, silver or gold leaf are timeless.

Start small.

While Kraiem says she loves a metallic ceiling or a shiny papered wall, accessories are the best way to introduce metallics into your space. (Try an antique silver tea set or tray, for instance.) “They’re easy to change out or move around the room to find the perfect balance,” she says. More permanent pops of metallic can also be incorporated in small doses — Kraiem currently has her eye on a stunning hammered metal sink for a powder room, and says she’s been using a gold mosaic tile in a herringbone pattern as a kitchen backsplash for some time.

When in doubt, just go for it. “I like to incorporate metallic pieces and mirrors into
every project,” Kraiem says. “They reflect light and many times open up a space.” And they almost always give a dull space a more interesting and unexpected touch, she adds.

Until next time…
Blessings from my home to yours,
Nancy
Dedicated to helping you live your rooms—not the other way around
Share and Enjoy:
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • del.icio.us
  • Digg
  • Reddit
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • Print
  • email

Victorian Exterior by POC+P architectsIf you’ve decided to paint the exterior of your home, this is the time of year to do it.

Deciding on the color, however, can be daunting. You paint a gazillion different color samples on the side of your house and you just aren’t sure. Do this with enough different hues and your eyes begin to cross and none of the shades look right.
This is one area of design where hiring a color expert really can save you money, time, and frustration. Repainting a wall inside your home because you don’t like the color is one thing. Repainting the exterior is a different matter and not something you want to happen.
I invite you to take this fun quiz. The questions are what color expert JENNIFER OTT, http://genottdesign.com asks her clients when deciding color choices. You may or may not agree with the color choice that pops up for you, but it might offer food for thought.
Until next time…
Blessings from my home to yours…
Nancy
Dedicated to helping you live your rooms—not the other way around
Share and Enjoy:
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • del.icio.us
  • Digg
  • Reddit
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • Print
  • email
When decorating, we generally think “pops” of color means adding brights to an otherwise neutral room such as beige, greige, creme, taupe, gray, etc.
However, consider using a powerful contrast color like white. It’s crisp, clean, refreshing, and soothing to the eye.
White can keep darker colors from feeling too heavy, and brighter colors feeling overwhelming. It can also keep a color like beige from feeling, well, too blandly beige.
Take a look at these photos and imagine if white hadn’t been used as the accent color. The rooms wouldn’t have the same visual impact and the design element would be diminished.
Remember, too, as with any accent color, spread it around the room so it’s integrated and feels balanced.
It just might be that using white as a contrast is the best “pop” of color of all!
(PHOTOS from HOUZZ)
Until next time…
Blessings from my home to yours,
Nancy
Dedicated to helping you live your rooms—not the other way around
Share and Enjoy:
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • del.icio.us
  • Digg
  • Reddit
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • Print
  • email
It’s the height of summer and that means vacation time.
Traveling to new or favorite places.
Visiting friends and family, or entertaining in our own homes.
And what is an important part of this?
Photographs—many, many photos.
And where do these captured for all time special moments live?
You guessed right if you said they hide in our smart phones. Hundreds of them that we forget about.
That’s why I’m strongly in favor of printed photos. This week’s article is from ELLEDECOR.COM and gives some great ideas on ways to share your treasured memories.
Until next time…
Blessings from my home to yours,
Nancy
Dedicated to helping you live your rooms—not the other way around
Share and Enjoy:
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • del.icio.us
  • Digg
  • Reddit
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • Print
  • email
A few days ago, I took a road trip out into the country and was blown away by all of the gorgeous shades of spring green that were everywhere. At one point, I had to get out of the car, take a deep breathe, and revel in the freshness of it all.
It’s that particular shade of soft green only seen in nature at this time of year as the new leaves burst forth. It’s kind of a declaration that winter is truly over and the earth has come alive once again.
Spring green is one of nature’s most soothing hues and perhaps that’s why it can work so well in our homes. It also complements and blends harmoniously with many other colors.
Take a look at these photos for some ideas on bringing the outdoors inside. It doesn’t need to be an entire room of green either. It could be just one wall or ceiling; a piece of furniture; cabinets; tile in a bathroom; using wallpaper instead of paint or picking up the color in your accessories. The choices are many and entirely up to you.
Blessings from my home to yours,
Nancy
Dedicated to helping you live your rooms—not the other way around
Photos via HOUZZ442
Share and Enjoy:
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • del.icio.us
  • Digg
  • Reddit
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • Print
  • email
How often have you looked through shelter magazines or seen images online that show a color you fall in love with. You may even have the color’s name and brand so you tried it in your own home and couldn’t believe how different it looked on your wall.
There are very good reasons why this happens and there is a way around it. This week’s article is from Vanessa Brunner, Houzz Editorial Staff. She interviewed photographers Christopher Stark and David Duncan Livingston, and designer Jean Verbridge. These shared tips will tell you how to find and get the perfect color for your own home.
Best of all, it’ll save you time, money, and frustration.
Until next time…
Blessings from my home to yours,
Nancy
Dedicated to helping you live your rooms—not the other way around
Share and Enjoy:
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • del.icio.us
  • Digg
  • Reddit
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • Print
  • email
More About

More About

Read more about Nancy Meadows and her work as a designer...

Services

Services

Find out how Nancy can help you in solving your design dilemmas...

Contact

Contact

Begin the process of decorating your home or work space with Nancy Meadows...