Last week I talked about using wallpaper instead of paint for walls and/or ceiling.
This week I want to show you some ideas of using simple framing and wallpaper to create an art piece.
TOUCH INTERIORS
Framed wallpaper. A bright, circus-inspired diamond print paper from Cole & Son was used like a huge art installation in this vibrant living space. Using simple moldings painted to match the walls creates the look of a giant frame around the wallpaper. When to think of framed wallpaper: Framing wallpaper, either in actual frames, or using molding, is a great way to show off a bold, artistic paper without covering an entire wall.
Rather than papering an entire wall, the designer chose to use simple molding to cover just a portion of the wall. This paper is so bold, that an entire wall of it could have been overboard. Using molding, it becomes a huge art installation .
ALEXANDER JOHNSON PHOTOGRAPHY
Framed wallpaper is a fantastic and simple alternative to wall art or wallpapering the entire wall. The frame sizes can be customized as you or your designer sees fit. The pattern is repeated in the window treatment.
The framed wallpaper become the art pieces in this dining room. The design was repeated in the window treatments.
RACHEL OLIVER DESIGN, LLC
Lengths of wallpaper framed with basic wooden wall molding beef up the headboards of a pair of four-posters in this bedroom. A gorgeous F. Schumacher paper was used here, but you could frame a really pretty gift wrap for a budget take on this look.
In this photo, beautiful chinoiserie paper has been chosen as “headboards” for a guest room.
ELIZABETH GORDON
Go garden green. The inspiration for this dining room was a garden that’s framed by the room’s windows. “The clients wanted the majority of the house interiors to reflect the cool blues and greens found on property,” says designer Elizabeth Gordon.
In this example, wallpaper is applied only to the ceiling. How gorgeous is this living room?
THE UPWARD BOUND HOUSE by ELIZABETH BOMBERER
Painted the same color as the wall, the box molding is not a distraction for the large patterned wallpaper it frames. The result is big on drama. More ways with molding: Molding: Add Texture by Detailing Your Detail.
A dining room application where the frames are painted the same color as the walls. They almost disappear focusing your eyes on the paper design. Note: I would have painted the electrical outlet cover the same color as the walls for a seamless look.
SHOSHANA GOSSELIN
Create a multi-layered gallery – Secure some painted moulding to the wall to create frames, then layer box-framed trinkets on top of grass cloth wallpaper. It’s infinitely more interesting than a painted wall or single piece of art hung above the bed.
This last example uses framed grass cloth and framed real objects creating a 3-D effect. It’s used above the bed and on each side of the bed. Really beautiful.
These are just a few ideas of how wallpaper can be used to ARTfully enhance your interior decor in unusual ways.
Until next time…
Blessings from my home to yours,
Nancy
Dedicated to helping you live your rooms—not the other way around
Photos via HOUZZ
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As an interior designer, I love including metallic’s in every space. Whether it’s paint, wallpaper, or accents, metallic’s bounce light around a room and add that touch of glamour that can make you and your space feel special.
However, you don’t want your home to reflect Donald Trump’s where everything seems to sparkle with gold; so much (if you’ve ever seen photos) that you would practically need sunglasses to live there. There’s such a thing as “guilding the lily” to extreme.
JESSICA CUMBERBATCH ANDERSON interviewed for ELLEDECOR.COM interiot designer NATALIE KRAIEM for suggestions of using metallic’s in your interiors without going overboard.
Here are her 5 tips:

The trick with using metallic pieces and mirrors in a single space is to mix them with different, softer textures to balance them out, Kraiem says. “I love mixing in textures like mohair, velvet, and wool to let the metallic accents contrast and stand out on their own.

Keep the palette neutral.

When incorporating a lot of metallic pieces into a room, you’ll want to keep the color scheme fairly subdued. According to Kraiem, brass pairs nicely with darker colors such as black, navy and even purple or other jewel tones, while chrome, stainless and satin go nicely with more modern palettes such as gray, white and blue.

Mix it up.

It’s an age-old design debate, but Kraiem says mixing metals and finishes can be done to a stylish effect. “I like mixing polished brass with sterling silver and chrome,” she says. But generally speaking, you’ll want to use the same color metal (for example, gold) in different textures or finishes (polished brass, brushed brass, gold leaf, etc.). Mixing chrome with other silver metals such as brushed nickel or satin nickel, is another way to go.

Stick with the classics.

Although copper is having a moment in kitchens and lighting right now — it’s especially cool in a hammered texture, Kraiem notes — brass, chrome, silver or gold leaf are timeless.

Start small.

While Kraiem says she loves a metallic ceiling or a shiny papered wall, accessories are the best way to introduce metallics into your space. (Try an antique silver tea set or tray, for instance.) “They’re easy to change out or move around the room to find the perfect balance,” she says. More permanent pops of metallic can also be incorporated in small doses — Kraiem currently has her eye on a stunning hammered metal sink for a powder room, and says she’s been using a gold mosaic tile in a herringbone pattern as a kitchen backsplash for some time.

When in doubt, just go for it. “I like to incorporate metallic pieces and mirrors into
every project,” Kraiem says. “They reflect light and many times open up a space.” And they almost always give a dull space a more interesting and unexpected touch, she adds.

Until next time…
Blessings from my home to yours,
Nancy
Dedicated to helping you live your rooms—not the other way around
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Victorian Exterior by POC+P architectsIf you’ve decided to paint the exterior of your home, this is the time of year to do it.

Deciding on the color, however, can be daunting. You paint a gazillion different color samples on the side of your house and you just aren’t sure. Do this with enough different hues and your eyes begin to cross and none of the shades look right.
This is one area of design where hiring a color expert really can save you money, time, and frustration. Repainting a wall inside your home because you don’t like the color is one thing. Repainting the exterior is a different matter and not something you want to happen.
I invite you to take this fun quiz. The questions are what color expert JENNIFER OTT, http://genottdesign.com asks her clients when deciding color choices. You may or may not agree with the color choice that pops up for you, but it might offer food for thought.
Until next time…
Blessings from my home to yours…
Nancy
Dedicated to helping you live your rooms—not the other way around
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When decorating, we generally think “pops” of color means adding brights to an otherwise neutral room such as beige, greige, creme, taupe, gray, etc.
However, consider using a powerful contrast color like white. It’s crisp, clean, refreshing, and soothing to the eye.
White can keep darker colors from feeling too heavy, and brighter colors feeling overwhelming. It can also keep a color like beige from feeling, well, too blandly beige.
Take a look at these photos and imagine if white hadn’t been used as the accent color. The rooms wouldn’t have the same visual impact and the design element would be diminished.
Remember, too, as with any accent color, spread it around the room so it’s integrated and feels balanced.
It just might be that using white as a contrast is the best “pop” of color of all!
(PHOTOS from HOUZZ)
Until next time…
Blessings from my home to yours,
Nancy
Dedicated to helping you live your rooms—not the other way around
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It’s the height of summer and that means vacation time.
Traveling to new or favorite places.
Visiting friends and family, or entertaining in our own homes.
And what is an important part of this?
Photographs—many, many photos.
And where do these captured for all time special moments live?
You guessed right if you said they hide in our smart phones. Hundreds of them that we forget about.
That’s why I’m strongly in favor of printed photos. This week’s article is from ELLEDECOR.COM and gives some great ideas on ways to share your treasured memories.
Until next time…
Blessings from my home to yours,
Nancy
Dedicated to helping you live your rooms—not the other way around
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A few days ago, I took a road trip out into the country and was blown away by all of the gorgeous shades of spring green that were everywhere. At one point, I had to get out of the car, take a deep breathe, and revel in the freshness of it all.
It’s that particular shade of soft green only seen in nature at this time of year as the new leaves burst forth. It’s kind of a declaration that winter is truly over and the earth has come alive once again.
Spring green is one of nature’s most soothing hues and perhaps that’s why it can work so well in our homes. It also complements and blends harmoniously with many other colors.
Take a look at these photos for some ideas on bringing the outdoors inside. It doesn’t need to be an entire room of green either. It could be just one wall or ceiling; a piece of furniture; cabinets; tile in a bathroom; using wallpaper instead of paint or picking up the color in your accessories. The choices are many and entirely up to you.
Blessings from my home to yours,
Nancy
Dedicated to helping you live your rooms—not the other way around
Photos via HOUZZ442
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How often have you looked through shelter magazines or seen images online that show a color you fall in love with. You may even have the color’s name and brand so you tried it in your own home and couldn’t believe how different it looked on your wall.
There are very good reasons why this happens and there is a way around it. This week’s article is from Vanessa Brunner, Houzz Editorial Staff. She interviewed photographers Christopher Stark and David Duncan Livingston, and designer Jean Verbridge. These shared tips will tell you how to find and get the perfect color for your own home.
Best of all, it’ll save you time, money, and frustration.
Until next time…
Blessings from my home to yours,
Nancy
Dedicated to helping you live your rooms—not the other way around
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It seems to be the rule, in most cases, that ceilings are painted white.
Perhaps it’s because a white ceiling gives the illusion of a bigger and brighter space.
While there’s nothing wrong with this, you might be missing  out on what could be beautiful design by doing something different.
Think of your ceiling as the 5th wall. It deserves as much attention as you give all of the other aspects of your interior design.
Take a look at these photos for some exciting ways to take your ceilings from white to wow.

Soft and sophisticated, this monochromatic look is really beautiful. Try to imagine how different the feel would be if the ceiling were painted white.

The mocha shade on the ceiling is also used on the molding giving a cohesive look.

This is a great way to treat a tray ceiling. The green stripe is a bit lighter than the wall color, giving the room a soft , overall impression.
A favorite technique of mine that gives the feeling of a canopy bed. The molding is applied up the wall at the head of the bed and continues along the ceiling to the foot of the bed. The paint applied to this area is a high gloss creating a beautiful sheen. Remember, however, when using a high gloss finish, the walls/ceiling need to be flawlessly smooth.
Small rooms don’t need to be painted a white or lighter color as seen here. The darker walls and ceiling give the space a cozy feel.
The soft blue of the ceiling is brought into the furniture and accessories giving this beautiful room a light and airy feeling. As in photo # 2, the color extends onto the top of the walls.
Until next time…
Blessings from my home to yours,
Nancy
Dedicated to helping you live your rooms—not the other way around
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Color is magical and powerful.
It can transform a space because color affects us emotionally, mentally, and physically.
Imagine for a moment being surrounded in a Pepto Bismol pink painted room vs. a space colored in a soft, barely blush pink; you can feel your pulse rate rising and following respectively.
What we see, in our current state of evolution, is the primary source for all of our experiences.
And color is something we see. Amazingly, the human eye can distinguish between 7 and 10 million different colors!
For this article, I want to show you a few examples of colors that soothe the soul. Not surprisingly, they are colors found in nature.
They are all Sherwin Williams paint colors. via Huff Post Home
Soft Blues Soft Blues
Gray Blues Gray Blues
Aqua Blues Aqua Blues
Pale Greens Pale Greens
Dusty Pinks Dusty Pinks
Lavenders Lavenders
Beiges Beiges
Pale Grays Pale Grays
These hues slow down heart rate and lower blood pressure because they are calming. They’re all soft and less saturated. They are dustier and have been “greyed” down.
The colors you see here are going to be a little different from what you’ll see on your walls at home, so be sure to try an actual sample first.
And, as always, it has to be a color that you love or it won’t have the calming, soothing influence you desire.
Until next time…
Blessings from my home to yours,
Nancy
Dedicated to helping YOU live your rooms—not the OTHER way around
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Marsala - Pantone Color of the year 2015

Sensual and bold, delicious Marsala is a daringly inviting tone that nurtures; exuding confidence and stability while feeding the body, mind and soul “. This are the worlds on Pantone‘s website when you read abou this wonderful new color.

Every year the Pantone Color Institute chooses one color that they define as their “color of the Year.”
It shows up in fashion, cosmetics, paint, fabrics, home accessories, floral arrangements—almost everywhere.
The 2015 hue is called “Marsala.” It’s a red shade with brown undertones that create a very warm and rich color that blends well with many other colors. It’s easy on the eye.
BUT, and this is the most important question, is it easy on YOUR eyes?
Color choices are generally chosen on an emotional level. Some colors we love, some we hate, and still others we feel neutral about. No matter what colors you choose whether it’s your clothing, makeup, or in your home, it has to be one you love; it makes you feel good.
As I always say, you’re your very own trendsetter. You decide and that makes it the perfect color for you.  Take a look at these photos and see how many ways “Marsala” has been used. You could decide you’d like to add it to your own decor.
An entry way with a richer paint color and added accessories placed on a custom designed marble and burnished metal shelf.P.S. I used this color on an entrance hall wall for a client several years ago and called it “Root Beer.” Today it would be called “Marsala!
Until next time…
Blessings from my home to yours,
Nancy
Dedicated to helping YOU live your rooms—not the OTHER way around
Photos credit via KOMET
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